2020 Section Awards Results!

Congratulations to our 2020 Section Award Winners!

Sociology of Development Section Book Award

Co-Winners:

Bobel, Chris. 2019. The Managed Body: Developing Girls & Menstrual Health in the Global South. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Tarlau, Rebecca. 2019. Occupying Schools, Occupying Land: How the Landless Workers Movement Transformed Brazilian Education. Global and Comparative Ethnography Series. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Sociology of Development Section Faculty Article Award

Co-Winners:

Reyes, Victoria. 2018. “Port of Call: How Ships Shape Foreign-Local Encounters.” Social Forces, 96 (3): 1097–1118.

Paret, Marcel. 2018. “Critical Nostalgias in Democratic South Africa.” The Sociological Quarterly, 59 (4): 678-696.

Honorable Mention:

Ballakrishnen, Swethaa. 2019. “Just Like Global Firms: Unintended Gender Parity and Speculative Isomorphism in India’s Elite Professions.” Law & Society Review, 53 (1): 108-140.

Sociology of Development Section Graduate Student Paper Award

Winner:

Annavarapu, Sneha. “Risky Routes, Safe Suspicions: Gender, Class, and Cabs in Hyderabad, India.” (Unpublished) (Department of Sociology, University of Chicago)

Honorable Mention:

Utama, Rahardhika Arista. “Embedded Peasantry: Path-Dependence and Economic Transformation in Indonesia and Malaysia.” (Unpublished) (Department of Sociology, Northwestern University)

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New Issue Alert! Sociology of Development Fall 2020 Issue

The third issue of 2020 for Sociology of Development is now published and live! The link to the issue and table of contents is below.

Sociology of Development

VOLUME 6 NUMBER 3 FALL 2020

Link to issue: https://online.ucpress.edu/socdev/issue/6/3

Production Globalization and the Segmentation of the Global Manufacturing Sector

By MATTHEW MAHUTGA

The Empowerment Paradox: Exploring the Implications of Neoliberalized Feminism for Sustainable Development

By ORLA KELLY

“What Do They Want from Us?”: How Locals Work to Meet Their Employers’ Expectations in Jordan’s Aid Sector

By PATRICIA WARD

What a Small Group of People Can(’t) Do: An Analysis of Capable Agents for the Mobilization of Social Capital in Two Ghanaian Ecotourism Projects

By ANA-ELIA RAMÓN-HIDALGO, HOWARD W. HARSHAW, ROBERT A. KOZAK, AND DAVID B. TINDALL

The Technological Basis of Egalitarian Economic Growth: How Nineteenth-Century Norway’s Boats with No Decks Provided a Humanistic Alternative to Industrial Slums

By SAMUEL COHN AND MICHAEL UPCHURCH

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Sociology of Development Policy Brief: “Mass Incarceration as a Factor in the US Mortality Disadvantage”


A new Sociology of Development Policy Brief is out! Volume 5, Issue 6 (2020) is: “Mass Incarceration as a Factor in the US Mortality Disadvantage” by Sebastian Daza (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Alberto Palloni (University of Wisconsin-Madison), and Jerrett Jones (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Below is a message from our policy brief editor, Alaka M. Basu:

Here is the sixth of the 2020 series of Policy Briefs from the Sociology of Development section of ASA.  The brief is titled: “Mass Incarceration as a Factor in the US Mortality Disadvantage”, and is by Sebastian Daza, Alberto Palloni and Jerrett Jones (2020, vol 5, no. 6).

As usual, I welcome expressions of interest to contribute. While I am open to any ideas you have, your pitch should ideally include a reference to something you have published on the subject, so that we can assume a base level of peer reviewing of the material. There should also be some clear policy implications arising from the piece.

Thanks again,

Alaka M Basu, Professor,
Cornell University,
Department of Global Development,
250B Warren Hall,
Ithaca, NY 14853
Tel: 607-255-1487/607-793-8974

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Special Issue of the Delaware Review of Latin American Studies

Enrique Pumar is co-editing a special issue of the Delaware Review of Latin American Studies.

He says: we would be delighted to receive papers from our development colleagues and their contacts.  We are looking forward to publishing an inclusive and diverse issue with papers from different perspectives and disciplines.

For more information, see the link below:

https://www.dllc.udel.edu/polyglot-blog/Pages/DeRLAS—Call-for-papers.aspx

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Thank you!

Thank you to all of you who participated in the SOC DEV sessions at the ASA meeting the past two days. Despite the physical distance of the virtual platform, I enjoyed reconnecting with members I have long known and meeting new development scholars in such an intellectually stimulating way.

As Patrick Heller said yesterday at the conclusion of our last session, SOC DEV is one of few spaces that offers scope for genuine connection. The sessions that I attended suggest that it is very much possible to maintain this connection in a virtual format.

Back in the early days of our section, I attended a SOC DEV conference that Rae Blumberg organized at UVA. I was a nervous graduate student without much experience in conferencing, but the senior scholars of the section welcomed me with warmth and made me feel right at home.

I remember thinking that I had found my intellectual tribe in a diverse community of people who recognize that we do not have to look or think like one another in order to share knowledge, build coalitions, and become friends.

Since we did not hold a virtual business meeting yesterday, I would like to take a moment to recognize our award recipients, outgoing council members, and incoming members.

First, seven rounds of virtual applause to celebrate the outstanding contributions that our award winners have made to our field!

BOOK AWARD

Co-Winners:

Chris Bobel. 2019. The Managed Body: Developing Girls & Menstrual Health in the Global South. London: Palgrave Macmillan (Professor and Chair of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston)

Rebecca Tarlau. 2019. Occupying Schools, Occupying Land: How the Landless Workers Movement Transformed Brazilian Education. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Assistant Professor of Education and of Labor & Employment Relations, Pennsylvania State University)

FACULTY ARTICLE

Co-Winners:

Marcel Paret. 2018. “Critical Nostalgias in Democratic South Africa.” The Sociological Quarterly 59(4):678-696. (Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Utah)

Victoria Reyes. 2018. “Port of Call: How Ships Shape Foreign-Local Encounters.” Social Forces 96(3):1097–1118. (Assistant Professor of Sociology, UC Riverside)

Honorable Mention:

Swethaa Ballakrishnen. 2019. “Just Like Global Firms: Unintended Gender Parity and Speculative Isomorphism in India’s Elite Professions.” Law & Society Review 53(1):108-140. (Assistant Professor of Law, UCI Law)

GRADUATE PAPER

Winner:

Sneha Annavarapu. “Risky Routes, Safe Suspicions: Gender, Class, and Cabs in Hyderabad, India.” (University of Chicago, Department of Sociology)

Honorable mention:

Rahardika Utama. “Embedded Peasantry: Path-Dependence and Economic Transformation in Indonesia and Malaysia.” (Northwestern University, Department of Sociology)

Second, a big hand of applause to our outgoing council members who have devoted years of their service life to our section.

  • Outgoing past-chair: Andrew Jorgenson, Boston College
  • Outgoing council member: Kristy Kelly, Dreksel University
  • Outgoing council member: Poulami Roychowdhury, McGill University
  • Outgoing newsletter editor: Maria Akchurin (Tulane University)
  • Outgoing student representative Alvin Camba (Johns Hopkins University)

Third, a very warm welcome to incoming council members! Here is a full listing of 2020-2021 section leadership.

  • Chair: Matt Sanderson, Kansas State University
  • Chair-elect: Fauzia Ahmed, Miami University of Ohio
  • Past-chair: Jennifer Keahey, Arizona State University
  • Secretary Treasurer: Jennifer Hsu, University of New South Wales
  • Third-year council member: Margaret Frye, Princeton University
  • Third-year council member: Joseph Harris, Boston University
  • Second-year council member: Jordanna Matlon, American University
  • Second-year council member: Victoria Reyes, UC Riverside
  • Incoming council member: Shiri Noy, Denison University
  • Incoming council member: Firuzeh Shokooh Valle, Franklin & Marshall College
  • Incoming student representative: Lantian Li, Northwestern University
  • Policy brief editor: Alaka Basu, Cornell University
  • Senior newsletter co-editor: Jeb Sprague, UC Riverside
  • Incoming newsletter co-editor: Leslie MacColman, University of Notre Dame
  • Incoming newsletter co-editor: Preethi Krishnan, Western Carolina University
  • Webmaster: Michaela Curran, UC Riverside
  • Mentorship program coordinator: Karin Johnson, Texas A&M University

We will be updating our social media platforms with this information in the coming weeks, and we will be sending out the results of our section survey shortly. Council also will be holding our virtual conference council meeting at the start of next week. At the end of that meeting, I will formally pass the baton to Matt Sanderson.

Thank you so much for providing me with the opportunity to help lead this section into the second decade of its existence.

It has been a year of difficulty and perilous for many, but your collective knowledge, enthusiasm, and support have served to remind me that relationships can transcend borders, and that gives me hope.

In solidarity,

Jennifer

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ASA Sociology of Development Speed Mentoring Event

Hello, SocDev members!

I am happy to announce the first-ever ASA Soc of Dev mentoring program’s Speed Mentoring event on Monday, August 10th from 2:30 to 4:00 pm Pacific Standard Time.

Our panelists are:

Dr. Rhacel Salazar Parrenas, USC, Department of Sociology and Gender Studies

Dr. Smitha Radhakrishnan, Wellesley College, Departments of Women’s Studies and Sociology

Dr. Rebekah Burroway, Stony Brook University, Department of Sociology

Dr. Karin Johnson, US Census Bureau, Federal Statistical Research and Data Center at Texas A&M University

My plan for the event:

Over the 90 mins: 15 min intro (3-5 min each panelist to tell who they are, where they work, a brief description of their career trajectory, and what they can answer questions about in the Q&A); 30 mins moderated questions by me to the panelists; and 30 mins reserved for Q&A by the attendees (this will be either as the larger group or in break-out groups per specific interests).

I would like to open the event to all SocDev members. If you are not part of the SocDev 2020 Mentorship Program and would like to attend, please RSVP here: https://forms.gle/4QnNUWBFzBPYn2JE7

Thank you,

Karin Johnson

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Sociology of Development Sessions at ASA 2020!

The ASA Virtual Annual Meeting is fast approaching, and SOC DEV will be holding three of our originally planned sessions, so please register and reconnect with us!

The conference will occur online from August 8-11, following the originally scheduled session dates and times. Note that dates/times are based on Pacific daylight time (PDT).

Registration is free to all ASA members and only $25 for non-members.

This is a great opportunity for us to build ties with non-members who conduct development research in other disciplines or who work as practitioners. If you are connected to other development societies, please feel free to disseminate our program to their listservs and encourage your colleagues to attend our exciting line up of sessions.

In order to register for the event or see the broader virtual program, please go to the ASA 2020 Annual Meeting page here:

https://www.asanet.org/annual-meeting-2020

Here is a listing of the 2020 Sociology of Development sessions that are occurring online:

1. Global South Perspectives on Development

Zoom Live Session on Monday, August 10, 4:30-6:10pm PDT

Session Organizer and Presider: Devparna Roy, Nazareth College of Rochester

2. Open Panel on Sociology of Development

Zoom Live Session on Tuesday, August 11, 12:30-2:10pm PDT

Session Organizer and Presider: Sam Cohn, Texas A&M University

3. Populism, Democracy, and Development

Zoom Live Session on Tuesday, August 11, 2:30-4:10pm PDT

Session Presider: Firuzeh Shokooh-Valle, Franklin & Marshall College

Session Organizer: Jennifer Keahey, Arizona State University

4. Sociology of Development Refereed Roundtables

Zoom Live Session on Tuesday, August 11, 11:10am to 12:10pm PDT

* Check the online schedule to see the tables that will conduct virtual presentations.

Here is a listing of broader ASA development sessions that are occurring online:

5. Limits to Capital in the 21st Century

Zoom Live Session on Monday, August 10, 10:30am-12:10pm PDT

Session Organizer and Presider: Michael Levien, Johns Hopkins University

6. Gender, Development, and the State

Zoom Live Session on Monday, August 10, 8:30-10:10am PDT

Session Organizer: Manisha Desai, University of Connecticut

Session Presider: Christobel Asiedu, Louisiana Tech University

7. Gender and Development in India

Zoom Live Session on Monday, August 10, 2:30-4:10pm PDT

Session Organizer: Manisha Desai, University of Connecticut

Session Presider: Rita Jalali, American University

Regrettably cancelled SOC DEV sessions:

Food and Agriculture in Development
Sociology of Development Business meeting

*We will disseminate business meeting information via the listserv and the fall Sectors newsletter

Much gratitude to the session organizers and presiders who have gone above and beyond to ensure a strong virtual presence at the ASA this year.

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Purchase a Gift ASA Membership for a Student or Colleague!

Please note that Friday, July 31 is the last day to purchase a gift ASA membership for a student or a colleague.

Currently, SOC DEV membership is 419, with 22 low-income country members, 121 student members, and 276 regular members.

The good news is that our membership has remained robust despite the pandemic, and we will qualify for the same number of sessions for the 2021 ASA meeting that we have previously enjoyed. However, our membership has slightly decreased. In particular, I would like to see greater representation from low-income countries and the student cohort.

If you are able to support our colleagues and section by purchasing gift memberships, please do so before the end of this week. Also, if you are in a department that has a group ASA membership then you can request free membership for the new graduate students in your program.

Here are the ASA instructions for purchasing gift memberships:

*******

I. Instructions for Gift Memberships

Gift Memberships – July 31

ASA members can gift an ASA membership for students or a section membership for existing ASA members of any membership type by logging into https://asa.enoah.com. The earlier you give a gift membership, the longer the member has to enjoy the benefits of membership and learn more about the section.

To purchase a gift ASA membership for students
Once you have accessed the member portal, please click “Purchase a gift membership for a student” under Contribute/Give. Students can be searched by name through the online member database. A new contact record can be created by the member making the gift if the student is not found in the database.

Your gift will be redeemable by the recipient for an ASA student membership. Your gift recipient will receive the gift credit via email immediately after your purchase. Please note that gift recipients will need to complete a membership form through the ASA member portal in order to redeem the gift membership. Gift memberships are not refundable if unredeemed within 30 days of purchase. Gift memberships are not tax deductible.

The deadline for a 2020 gift ASA membership for students is July 31, 2020.

To purchase a gift section membership for a student or a colleague
Once you have accessed the member portal, please click “Purchase a gift section membership” under Contribute/Give.

Select the section and search for your recipient by first and last name. Section membership requires 2020 ASA membership. Only 2020 ASA members who do not already have a membership in that section are eligible to receive a gift. Your recipient will receive an email immediately after your payment with notification of the section gift. Your name will be included in this message. If the recipient declines the gift within 30 days of receipt, you will receive a refund by mail. Please note that section gift recipients do not need to take any action to redeem gift section membership. Gifts are not tax deductible.

The deadline for a 2020 gift section membership is July 31, 2020.

II. Instructions for Departments with ASA membership to Give New Students an ASA membership

It’s not too late for your 2019-2020 first-year graduate students to become 2020 ASA members at no cost. This is exclusive benefit for ASA Department Affiliates will give your first-year students all the same benefits as other ASA student members.

To give your 2019-2020 first-year graduate students access to this benefit:

1.    Log in to the ASA website with your department’s ID and password.

2.    Under the Graduate Department Resources heading, click the link that says “Activate free ASA membership for your first-year graduate students.”

3.    List the names and contact information for students who entered your program in 2019-2020. The students will receive an email with instructions on how to redeem their free membership for 2020. 

4.    Follow-up with your students to encourage them to redeem their membership.

When your department renews its affiliate membership for 2020-2021, your incoming first-year students will have access to this benefit for 2021. For now, don’t leave your 2019-2020 students behind. Help them connect with leading sociologists and develop their professional skills—submit their names today.

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Sociology of Development Policy Brief: “Why is Women’s Labor Force Participation So Low in the Middle East and North Africa?”

A new Sociology of Development Policy Brief is out! Volume 5, Issue 5 (2020) is: “Why is Women’s Labor Force Participation so Low in the Middle East and North Africa?” by Valentine M. Moghadam (Northeastern University)

Here is the fifth of the 2020 series of Policy Briefs from the Sociology of Development section of ASA.

The brief is titled: “Why is Women’s Labor Force Participation so Low in the Middle East and North Africa?”, and is by Valentine M. Moghadam  (2020, vol 5, iss. 5)

As usual, I welcome expressions of interest to contribute. While I am open to any ideas you have, your pitch should ideally include a reference to something you have published on the subject, so that we can assume a base level of peer reviewing of the material. There should also be some clear policy implications arising from the piece.

Alaka M. Basu, Professor
Department of Development Sociology
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
ab54@cornell.edu

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A Message from the Sociology of Development President

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing to you with a message of interracial solidarity on this day of Juneteenth, a US holiday that celebrates the liberation of Black Americans from the brutal institution of slavery.

Although this day is a reminder of the potential for social transformation, we know that we have a long way to go if we are to end the systemic violence perpetuated against Black people around the world.

Black Lives Matter.

The struggle for racial justice is not limited to the protests currently occurring in US cities, but it also is happening within the academy, where Black, Brown and Global South sociologists remain underrepresented and their bodies of knowledge undervalued.

To demonstrate solidarity with our Black and Brown colleagues at a potentially pivotal moment in US history, the SOC DEV Council has unanimously agreed to donate the $1,600 we had budgeted for the ASA 2020 reception to the ASA Minority Fellowship Program. This program provides training and support to junior sociologists of color. For more information, visit their webpage: https://www.asanet.org/careers/grants-and-fellowships/minority-fellowship-program.

We are joining 37 ASA sections who already have committed to donating their reception funds to the MFP. Indeed, 50 out of the ASA’s 52 sections are considering donating, making this an ASA-wide movement in support of racial justice. It is my sincere hope that with such a critical mass of interracial support, more systemic change may become possible.

When the SOC DEV Council meets this August, we will be discussing strategies for supporting Black development scholarship as well as our Black, Brown, and Global South section members, on a more permanent basis. If you have any ideas you would like to share, or if you would like to volunteer your time to this effort, please feel free to email me personally at Jennifer.Keahey@asu.edu. I will share any emails that I receive with Council in August.

If you would like to do more to support Black and Brown junior sociologists in the US, you may donate individually to the ASA Minority Fellowship Program here: https://www.asanet.org/donate.

Finally, I would like to take a moment to personally thank our incoming Council Member, Shiri Noy, for approaching me with the idea of making a donation.

In solidarity,

Jennifer Keahey

Chair, Section on Sociology of Development

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