Congrats to the 2021 ASA Sociology of Development Award Winners!

Congratulations to all of our 2021 section award winners and thank you to all who served on the committees!

ASA Sociology of Development Section Book Award

Committee: Firuzeh Shokooh Valle (Co-Chair), Joseph Harris (Co-Chair), Andy Chang, Sefika Kumral, Yao Li

Duquette-Rury, Laura. 2019.  Exit and Voice: The Paradox of Cross-Border Politics in Mexico. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

“Exit and Voice: The Paradox of Cross-Border Politics in Mexico” is a nuanced study of migrant hometown associations on local governance and development in Mexico. In drawing attention to the transnational work of HTAs, the book complicates our existing understanding of the state-social contract, reinterpreting classical theory on migration and development in bold new ways. It is a sophisticated mixed methods study that maximally demonstrates how the qualitative and quantitative can complement one another, and provides fascinating on-the-ground observations of the processes leading to emigrants’ reinvestment in hometown development.

Honorable Mention

Chuang, Julia. 2020. Beneath the China Boom: Labor, Citizenship, and the Making of a Rural Land Market. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

“Beneath the China Boom: Labor, Citizenship, and the Making of a Rural Land Market” is an extraordinary analysis of the hidden urban-rural and state-local policies and circuits of labor underlying China’s economic development. Through a rich ethnography, the book demonstrates  how rural villagers’ lives and livelihoods were deeply impacted by violent evictions, circular migration, and officialdom’s political machinations. The book points to important paradoxes in the Chinese case that upend commonly held assumptions in the literature. “Beneath the China Boom” has broad implications for scholars of migration, work, development, gender, and rural sociology.

ASA Sociology of Development Section Faculty Article Award

Committee: Victoria Reyes (Chair), Amanda Cheong, Jennifer Givens, Anne Mook, Marina Zaloznaya

Doering, Laura and Kristen McNeill. 2020. “Elaborating on the Abstract: Group Meaning-Making in a Colombian Microsavings Program.” American Sociological Review 85(3):417-450.

This article focuses on a government-sponsored microsavings program in Colombia. Drawing on a national survey that pinpointed a puzzle – the trend that despite increased financial inclusion, participants tended to lose interest in formal products throughout their participation in the program. To further understand this puzzle, the authors conducted 105 interviews and two years of observations from 28 savings group meetings across three cities. The authors solve this puzzle of why inclusion in the program resulted in losing interest through the organizational mechanisms. For the organization to dissemination program information across different groups of people, they had to abstract the information so it is consistent, and that the information was “timeless, placeless, and without context.” But because this information is so abstract, people then engaged in what the authors call “elaborating on the abstract,” whereby people shared personal (often negative) experiences, second-hand stories and information, and “coloring in neutral facts with negative emotional and moral values.” Thus, the very process that the organization engaged in, in order to reach so many people – providing information that can be used across settings – ends up being detrimental in practice as the information is divorced from on-the-ground practice. We found this article to be rich in both theory and empirics, shifting our understanding of microsavings programs at multiple levels of analysis. It is sure to be read, cited, and influence development policy and research for years to come.

Garrido, Marco. 2020. “Democracy as Disorder: Institutionalized Sources of  Democratic Ambivalence among the Upper and Middle Class in Manila.” Social Forces 99(3):1036–1059.

Why are democracies “backsliding” and their practices under attack? Drawing on 81 interviews, months of fieldwork in middle-class houses and civic associations, several years of ethnographic research in Metro Manila, the author posits a novel argument. Rather than democracy eroding because of weak political institutions and bad governance, the author pinpoints institutional contradictions as the key to understanding this problem. Participants saw democracy as amplifying disorder due to corruption, rule-bending, clientelism and informal settlements. The turn to “discipline” and “disciplining” democracy in order to address disorder better helps us see democratic backsliding as the result of institutional contradictions as moral dilemmas. We found this article to be rich in both theory and empirics, presenting a novel argument about how and why democratic backsliding occurs. Why are democracies “backsliding” and their practices under attack? Drawing on 81 interviews, months of fieldwork in middle-class houses and civic associations, several years of ethnographic research in Metro Manila, the author posits a novel argument. Rather than democracy eroding because of weak political institutions and bad governance, the author pinpoints institutional contradictions as the key to understanding this problem. Participants saw democracy as amplifying disorder due to corruption, rule-bending, clientelism and informal settlements. The turn to “discipline” and “disciplining” democracy in order to address disorder better helps us see democratic backsliding as the result of institutional contradictions as moral dilemmas. We found this article to be rich in both theory and empirics, presenting a novel argument about how and why democratic backsliding occurs.

Honorable Mention

Levenson, Zachary. 2019. “‘Such elements do not belong in an ordered society’: Managing rural–urban resettlement in democratic South Africa.” Journal of Agrarian Change 19(3):427-446.

What are the factors that drive dispossession, and the rationales that are mobilized to explain it? The author draws on 17 total months of fieldwork and interviews with housing officials, non-governmental officials, activists and lawyers to understand this question in the context of the “impossible situation” that has arisen in postapartheid South Africa: the end of racialized restrictions on migration, the ensuing shortage in formal housing in urban areas, and the government’s constitutional obligation to guarantee citizens’ right to adequate housing. The author argues that pointing to neoliberal logics is insufficient for understanding why the government chooses to evict land occupiers. Rather, governmental rationales for pursuing evictions in post-apartheid South Africa must be understood with regard to “the contingencies of democratic politics.” Government officials discursively create moralizing distinctions between patient, deserving citizens who are on a wait list for housing and those “unruly queue jumpers” who threaten democracy. Housing officials focus on those “queue jumpers” as a cause of the housing crisis and policing of land occupations, rather than a consequence of institutionalized inequities. We found this article to be richly engaging in its ethnographic insight as well as its theorizing, helping us to better understand how dynamics of neoliberalism and democratization affect the allocation of rights, such as housing, among citizens.

2021 ASA Sociology of Development Section Graduate Student Paper Award

Committee: Shiri Noy (Chair), Jason Mueller, Emily Springer, Jeffrey Swindle

It was my pleasure to chair the committee for the graduate student paper award this year and I want to acknowledge the careful and dedicated work of committee members Jason Mueller (UC Irvine), Emily Springer (Arizona State University), and Jeffrey Swindle (University of Texas) on selecting the recipients of this award. We received many excellent and well-written manuscripts and our decision was a difficult one. In particular, we were impressed and excited by the wide-ranging and thoughtful work that graduate student development sociologists are doing: indeed, our section’s future is in good hands! We selected a winner and an honorable mention.

Urbina, Daniela R. “Mass Education and Women’s Autonomy: Evidence from Latin America.”

In this sophisticated paper Daniela leverages the differential timing of compulsory school reforms in Bolivia, Colombia, and Peru in an instrumental variable design to investigate the effect of mass schooling reforms in women’s autonomy in families. She finds that while women’s education is associated with greater autonomy, as education systems expand, these returns are increasingly diminished. She proposes that these results are partly explained by changes in the selection into schooling and the effects of women’s education on their marriage patterns. Therefore, for vulnerable groups complying with compulsory reforms, further schooling did not fulfill the promise of empowerment. Together, these results highlight the importance of examining the differential returns to mass schooling and the threatening meaning of women’s education in high gender inequality contexts.

Honorable Mention

Falzon, Danielle. “The Ideal Delegation: How Institutional Privilege Silences ‘Developing’ Nations in the UN Climate Negotiations.”

In this important article, forthcoming in Social Problems, Danielle makes an important contribution to our understanding of how development ideals shape global governance on urgent issues such as climate change. She utilizes an institutional lens to argue that idealized national delegations to the UN climate negotiations are from large, English-speaking countries that leverage Western scientific and legal expertise and that have the financial resources to send the same negotiators year after year. In this way, countries that more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change are most discounted in negotiations to decide how the world should address climate change. The paper makes a clear and strong connection between macro-level theoretical questions of global power asymmetries, meso-level insights on institutional practices, and micro-sociological insights on how the “lived experiences” of UN delegates reflect and refract (pre)existing world scale social relations.

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Sociology of Development Policy Brief: “‘Morality Policy’ vs Social or Development Policy: The Catholic Church in the Politics of Abortion in Ireland and Poland”


A new Sociology of Development Policy Brief is out! Volume 6, Issue 4 (2021) is “‘Morality Policy’ vs Social or Development Policy: The Catholic Church in the Politics of Abortion in Ireland and Poland” by Sydney Calkin (Queen Mary University of London) and Monika Ewa Kaminska (University of Breman).

Below is a message from our policy brief editor, Alaka M. Basu:

As usual, I welcome expressions of interest to contribute. While I am open to any ideas you have, your pitch should ideally include a reference to something you have published on the subject, so that we can assume a base level of peer reviewing of the material. There should also be some clear policy implications arising from the piece.

Thanks again,

Alaka M Basu, Professor,
Cornell University,
Department of Global Development,
250B Warren Hall,
Ithaca, NY 14853
Tel: 607-255-1487/607-793-8974

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Sociology of Development Policy Brief: “Time Poverty and Multi-Tasking among Women with Young Children in India”

A new Sociology of Development Policy Brief is out! Volume 6, Issue 3 (2021) is: Time Poverty and Multi-Tasking among Women with Young Children in India” by by  Laili Irani (Independent Researcher) and Vidya Vemireddy (Indian Institute of Management).

A message from our Policy Brief editor Alaka Basu:

Here is the third of the 2021 series of Policy Briefs being edited by me for the Sociology of Development section of ASA.

The policy brief is titled: “Time Poverty and Multi-tasking Among Women with Young Children in India” by Laili Irani and Vidya Vemireddy (2021, vol 6, iss. 3)

I welcome expressions of interest to contribute. While I am open to any ideas you have, your pitch should ideally include a reference to something you have published on the subject, so that we can assume a base level of peer reviewing of the material.

Thanks again,

Alaka

Email: ab54@cornell.edu

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Join the Feminist Development sub-section!

Feminist Development is one of three subsections of Sociology of Development. Membership is open to all section members.

Why should section members join us? Feminist Development brings together scholars and professionals who recognize that many development approaches continue to sideline women, girls, and other marginalized groups, articulate and affirm feminist approaches to development, seek more holistic understanding of the power dynamics informing development, and support collaboration across difference. The Subsection provides a platform for interacting in person and virtually to exchange information and resources on feminist development.

Subsection Leadership                                                                                                                 

Co-chairs: Rae Lesser Blumberg, University of Virginia; Arizona State University and  Firuzeh Shokooh Valle, Franklin & Marshall College                                                                              

Past Co-chairs: Jennifer Keahey, Arizona State University and Kristy Kelly, Columbia University and Drexel University                                                                                                                               

Secretary Treasurer: Devparna Roy, Nazareth College of Rochester                                  

Council: Amira Karaoud, Independent Scholar; Susan Lee, Boston University; Marcia Texler Segal, Advances in Gender Research

To join the Subsection and participate on our listserv email co-chair Firuzeh Shokooh Valle (fshokooh@fandm.edu).

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Spring 2021 Edition of Sectors Newsletter

The latest edition of our section’s newsletter, Sectors (Spring 2021), is now out! It is full of information about Sociology of Development events, publications, and people. It also includes a special symposia on the unevenness of testing, production, and distribution of Covid-19 vaccines (the symposia also appear on the Sectors Symposia section of the site).

A big thank you to the editors, Jeb Sprague, Leslie MacColman, and Preethi Krishnan Ramaswamy, our exceptionally dedicated and talented newsletter editors, for this excellent issue!

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Section Election Results – ASA Sociology of Development Section

We are pleased to announce the ASA Sociology of Development Section election results. Congratulations to those elected and thank you to everyone who volunteered to run!

Chair-Elect (1-year): Enrique Pumar, Santa Clara University

Secretary-Treasurer (3-year): Matthias vom Hau, Institut Barcelona d’Estudies Internacionals

Council Member (3-year): Marco Garrido, University of Chicago

Council Member (3-year): Depvarna Roy, Nazareth College

Graduate Student Council Member (1-year): Rahardhika Utama, Northwestern University 

The proposed bylaws amendment has also been approved. This award will allow us to formally recognize efforts to take sociology into the world, and acknowledge sociological and sociologically-inspired work in the field and outside of academic settings. 

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Join Us for DEVSOCLINK 2021!

Join us for DEVSOCLINK 2021, which kicks off on Wednesday, June 2nd, 2021! Click here to register (for free!) for the events. You will be sent an email with the zoom links and passcodes.

The most up-to-date schedule is here and also listed below for your reference. We look forward to seeing you there!

DEVSOCLINK 2021

ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL ASSOCATION SECTION ON DEVELOPMENT 2021

PROGRAMME

ALL EVENTS ARE ON ZOOM

THE ZOOM LINKS WILL BE SENT TO OFFICIALLY REGISTERED PARTICIPANTS

WEDNESDAY JUNE 2

1 PM EASTERN/NOON CENTRAL/11 AM MOUNTAIN/10 AM PACIFIC

AN HOUR AND A HALF

FIRST KEYNOTE SESSION

THE SOCIAL SCIENCE OF DEVELOPMENT AND PANDEMICS

JAYATI GHOSH

(University of Massachusetts Amherst)

Development Challenges in the Time of COVID-19

PRERNA SINGH

(Brown University)

Contagion, Vaccination and a Moral Theory of Compliance

Fauzia Ahmed

(Miami of Ohio)

Moderator

MONDAY JUNE 7

NOON EASTERN/11 AM CENTRAL/10 AM MOUNTAIN/9 AM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

OPEN TOPIC TABLE: WOMEN’S ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT AND GENDER INEQUALITY IN LIVELIHOOD OPPORTUNITIES

Conveners and Moderators:

Rachael Pierroti

Sophia Friedson-Ridenour

(World Bank)

THURSDAY JUNE 10

5 PM EASTERN/4 PM CENTRAL/3 PM MOUNTAIN/2 0M PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

OPEN TOPIC TABLE: DEVELOPMENT ISSUES IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

Convener and Moderator:

Samuel Cohn

 (Texas A & M)

SATURDAY JUNE 12

4 PM EASTERN/3 PM CENTRAL/2 PM MOUNTAIN/1 PM PACIFIC

ONE HOUR

PAPER PANEL: GENDER AND CIVIL SOCIETY

JUNMIN WANG

(Memphis)

GABRIEL CHIU

(Harvard)

Global Financial Inclusion, Social Security Assurance and Gendered Entrepreneurial Intention in Developing Nations

ROBERT WOODBERRY

(Baylor)

Future of the Past: Protestant Missions’ Persistent Impact on Democracy

TUESDAY JUNE 15

2 PM EASTERN/1 PM CENTRAL/NOON MOUNTAIN/11 AM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

PAPER PANEL: GLOBAL HEALTH AND PANDEMICS

JULIANA DE CASTRO GALVAO

(CUNY)

LUISA NAZARENO

(Georgia State)

Analyzing the Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers on Poverty, Inequality and Employment Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic: Case Study From Brazil

IIM HALIMATUSA’DIYAH

(UIN Syarif Hidayatullah)

Mental Health as a Political Problem: Public Anxiety and State Capacity To Respond to Pandemics

PAYAL HATHI

(UC-Berkeley)

Estimating Stillbirth and Stillbirth-Adjusted Infant Mortality: How Ignoring the Burden of Stillbirth Mischaracterizes Child Health Challenges in Low and Middle-Income Countries

(Session Listing Continues on Next Page)

JAMES G. LINN

(Optimal Solutions in Healthcare and International Development)

JORGE CHUAQUI

(Valparaiso)

COVID in Chile: Personal and Political Implications

FRIDAY JUNE 18

NOON EASTERN/11 AM CENTRAL/10 AM MOUNTAIN/9 AM PACIFIC

THREE AND A HALF HOURS (INCLUDING 2 15 MINUTE BREAKS)

PAPER PANEL: URBAN INFORMALITY IN LATIN AMERICA

LISSETTE ALIAGA

(Nebraska-Omaha)

Disentangling the Effects of Informal Employment and Cash Transfers on the Spread of COVID-19 Across Peru During the 100-Day Lockdown

(Session Listing Continues on Next Page)

JORGE DERPIC

(Georgia)

This is the Gate to the Wonder City: Ethnic Differentiation and Informal Market Competiton At a Station of the Cable Car System of El Alto, Bolivia

YU CHEN

(Toronto)

Adapting to Formality in the Financial Era: Informalities in Formally Produced Social Interest Housing Projects in Mexico

MATIAS DEWEY

(Saint Gallen)

Political Economy of Aspiration at in Informal Garment Marketplace

JACINTO CUVI

(London School of Economics)

Protecting Informal Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Comparison of Federal Policies in Brazil and Mexico

MONIKA STREULE

(ETH Zurich)

Popular Urbanization: Toward a More Decentered Vocabulary of Urbanization

MONDAY JUNE 21

2 PM EASTERN/1 PM CENTRAL/NOON MOUNTAIN/11 AM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

PAPER PANEL: LOCAL GOVERNANCE DYNAMICS

SIROJUDDIN ARIF

RISA WARDATUN NIHAYAH

SHINTIA REVINA

SYAIKHU USMAN

NIKEN RARASATI

(Smeru Research Institute)

Difficulty of Improving Learning: District Head’s Power and Education Policies in Indonesia’s Decentralized Political System

VITOR MARTINS DIAS

(Indiana)

Global Environmental Change, Local Government Challenges: Grappling with Subnational Climate Politics

ESTHER HERNÁNDEZ-MEDINA

(Pomona)

Institutional Catalysts and Citizen Participation: Case of the Historic Center’s Fiduciary Fund in Mexico City

AMANDA BERTANA

(Southern Connecticut State)

SARITA GAYTAN

(Utah)

Chasing Kava: From Economic Growth to Rural Counter-Productivity

THURSDAY JUNE 24

5 PM EASTERN/4 PM CENTRAL/3 PM MOUNTAIN/2 PM PACIFIC

TWO AND THREE QUARTER HOURS (WITH A FIFTEEN MINUTE BREAK)

PAPER PANEL: OLD AND NEW IDEAS IN PUBLIC HEALTH

TUBA AGARTAN

(Providence)

Politics of Diffusion is More Than a Telephone Game: Tracing the Movement of Universal Coverage in the Developing-8

RYAN NEHRING

(Cambridge)

Digitinzing Agro-Diversity: Challenges for the Global Governance of Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture in the Twenty-First Century

OMRI TUBI

(Northwestern)

Devolutionary State Building: Making Israeli Structural Power in the Field of Public Health

MARY COLLIER-WILKS

(Virginia)

Divergent Partnerships: INGOs and Organizational Coupling in Cambodia

LANTIAN LI

(Northwestern)

Rentier Developmentalism: How Contradictory Health Reforms Spoiled the Pharmaceutical Industry in China

SATURDAY JUNE 26

1 PM EASTERN/NOON CENTRAL/11 AM MOUNTAIN/10 AM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

PAPER PANEL: TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT II

DIANA JUE-RAJASINGH

(Michigan)

Framing Social Impact for Exchange Partners: Field Experiment

Chasing Kava: From Economic Growth to Rural Counter-Productivity

KRISTEN HOPEWELL

(University of British Columbia)

China Paradox: What Rules for a (Developing) Economic Powerhouse?

JENNIFER KEAHEY

(Arizona State)

Decolonizing Trade: Post-Colonial History of Post-Soviet Latvia and Post-Apartheid South Africa

JOSE MORALES

MADISON POE

BRYSON BASSETT

YILIN LI

(Texas A & M)

Linkage-Based Growth: Analysis of Global Multiplier Variation and Its Size Determinants

MONDAY JUNE 28

6 PM EASTERN/5 PM CENTRAL/4 PM MOUNTAIN/3 PM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

OPEN TOPIC TABLE: GLOBAL CHINA – DEVELOPMENT PARTNER, CAPITALIST LENDER, BOTH, NEITHER?

Convener and Moderator:

Robert Wyrod

(Colorado)

TUESDAY JUNE 29

4 PM EASTERN/3 PM CENTRAL/2 PM MOUNTAIN/1 PM PACIFIC

ONE AND A HALF HOURS

PAPER PANEL: GENDER AND CIVIL SOCIETY II

FAUZIA ERFAN AHMED

(Miami of Ohio)

Progress or Patriarchy: Ascendent Muslim Masculinity in Bengladesh

YAO LI

MARION CASSARD

(Florida)

Acclaiming vs. Marginalizing Protest – Media Framing of the Hong Kong Anti-Extradition Movement and the French Yellow Vest Movement

JUDYANNET MUCHIRI

(Memorial)

Safe Spaces For Young Women’s Civic Participation in Kenya

THURSDAY JULY 1

6 PM EASTERN/5 PM CENTRAL/4 PM MOUNTAIN/3 PM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

OPEN TOPIC TABLE: STATE AND DEVELOPMENT IN CHINA

Convener and Moderator:

Lynette Ong

 (Toronto)

TUESDAY JULY 6

2 PM EASTERN/1 PM CENTRAL/NOON MOUNTAIN/11 AM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

OPEN TOPIC TABLE: SOCIOLOGY OF THE HIGH TECH SECTOR

Convener and Moderator:

Lynette Ong

 (Toronto)

WEDNESDAY JULY 7

4 PM EASTERN/3 PM CENTRAL/2 PM MOUNTAIN/1 PM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

OPEN TOPIC TABLE: CORRUPTION

Conveners and Moderators:

Leslie MacColman

 (Ohio State)

Luiz Vilaca

Tomas Gold

(Notre Dame)

SATURDAY JULY 10

NOON EASTERN/11 AM CENTRAL/10 AM MOUNTAIN/9 AM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

OPEN TOPIC TABLE: FUTURE OF THE PEASANTRY

Conveners and Moderators:

Devparna Roy

 (Nazareth)

Mushahid Hussain

(Cornell)

MONDAY JULY 12

5 PM EASTERN/4 PM CENTRAL/3 PM MOUNTAIN/2 PM PACIFIC

TWO HOURS

PAPER PANEL: ROOTING AND ROTTEN PLANTATION COMMUNITIES IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH

RAHARDHIKA UTAMA

(Northwestern)

Politics of Memory, Underdevelopment, and Remnants of Political Violence in the Sumatra Rubber Belt

PERDANA ROSWALDY

(Northwestern)

How Many Plantations Does a State Need? Revitalization of Indonesia’s Plantations

SOFYAN ANSORI

(Northwestern)

Negotiating the Burning Future: Indigenous People, Plantation Infrastructure and Fire Governance in Indonesia

ATMAEZAR HARIARA SIMANJUNTAK

(Northwestern)

Stuck and Confused: Plantation Agriculture and the Morality of Impoverishment

WEDNESDAY JULY 14

3 PM EASTERN/2 PM CENTRAL/1 PM MOUNTAIN/NOON PACIFIC

AN HOUR AND A HALF

CLOSING KEYNOTE SESSION

DEVELOPMENT SOCIOLOGY AND THE FUTURE OF THE WORLD

THE PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS:

MATT SANDERSON

(Kansas State)

Development Sociology Now

THE FOUNDER’S ADDRESS:

SAMUEL COHN

(Texas A & M)

Could Development Die?

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Sociology of Development Policy Brief: “Workplace Disability and Death in an Era of Mass Incarceration: Insights from the US Military”

A new Sociology of Development Policy Brief is out! Volume 6, Issue 2 (2021) is: “Workplace Disability and Death in an Era of Mass Incarceration: Insights from the US Military” by Eiko Strader (George Washington University)

A message from our Policy Brief editor Alaka Basu:

Here is the second of the 2021 series of Policy Briefs being edited by me for the Sociology of Development section of ASA: “Workplace Disability and Death in an Era of Mass Incarceration: Insights from the US Military” by Eiko Strader (vol 6, no. 2). It describes the special risks faced in the military by recruits with criminal records.

I welcome expressions of interest to contribute. While I am open to any ideas you have, your pitch should ideally include a reference to something you have published on the subject, so that we can assume a base level of peer reviewing of the material.

Thanks again,

Alaka

Email: ab54@cornell.edu

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Sociology of Development Policy Brief: “Good Governance Can Reduce the Gender Gap in Secondary Schooling”

A new Sociology of Development Policy Brief is out! Volume 6, Issue 1 (2021) is: “Good Governance Can Reduce the Gender Gap in Secondary Schooling” by Jamie M. Sommer (University of South Florida) and Kathleen M. Fallon (Stony Brook University).

Also, here is a message from our Policy Brief editor Alaka Basu:

As usual, I welcome expressions of interest to contribute. While I am open to any ideas you have, your pitch should ideally include a reference to something you have published on the subject, so that we can assume a base level of peer reviewing of the material. There should also be some clear policy implications arising from the piece.

Thanks again,

Alaka

Email: ab54@cornell.edu

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DevSoc Link 2021: ASA Sociology of Development Section Conference

Last year was the first year since the inception of the section that we were not able to hold an annual section conference.  The pandemic continues to disrupt our plans, and we continue to adapt. This year, we are planning to renew our annual section conference this summer with a virtual conference: DevSoc Link 2021! The call for papers and details are below. The due date of April 20, 2021! You can email your applications (here is the form) to socdevlink@gmail.com.

The Conference Organizing Committee is: Sam Cohn, Robert Clark, Rita Jalal, Karin Johnson, Amber Blazek, Barbara Wejnert, Tuba Agartan, Fauzia Ahmed, Heidi Rademacher, and Anthony Roberts. We thank them for their hard work organizing this wonderful event!

GOOD NEWS!

THERE WILL BE A SOCIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE THIS SUMMER!

IT IS CALLED DEVSOC LINK 2021!

IT WILL BE ON ZOOM!

IT WILL BE ZOOM PAIN FREE!

IT WILL BE LOW PRESSURE LOW INTENSE!

AND YOU GET TO MEET A TON OF OTHER DEVELOPMENT SOCIOLOGISTS

 WHO ARE INTO THE SAME THINGS YOU ARE!

OKAY HERE ARE THE SPECS FOR DEVSOC LINK 2021

WITH THE TIMING THE DEADLINES AND

THE COOL STUFF WE HAVE NEVER DONE BEFORE!

When: The Six Weeks Between June 15 and August 1

Intensity: No More Than One or Two Sessions a Day

Do As Many or As Few As You Like

Deadline for Submitting Proposals/Materials: April 20.

Level of Effort Required To Put In A Proposal: Pretty Minimal

Possibilities For Connecting With Other Development Sociologists and Having Intellectual Conversations You Like: High

We will be running all sorts of Zoom Sessions

Between June 15 and August 1.

These will be at different times of day to accommodate different people with different real world responsibilities. (Child care, Teaching Classes, Sleep, Survival)

The number of sessions per day will be kept minimal to keep people from having to take whole days off to attend a conference.

What Will Be At Devsoc Link 2021:

Ranging From the Most Orthodox to the Least Orthodox

1) Keynotes By Famous Sociologists

2) Traditional Paper Sessions

(You only need to submit an abstract. We Are Open To Both Receiving Preconstructed Sessions of Papers and To Receiving Proposals For Individual Papers To Be Put In a Session )

3) Open Topic Tables For Free Discussion

YOU Choose the Topic

(You Send Us a Topic. We Schedule a Zoom Room Where Anyone Who Wants To Discuss the Topic Can Show Up)

4) Soulmate/Wild Combo One-on-One Dialogues

The Biggest Attraction of Going to Conferences Is Having One on One Discussions Over Dinner, Coffee or Beer With Someone You Never Would Have Met At Home. This Person Often Unblocks Your Research Or Sets You In A Direction You Never Would Have Thought Of Yourself.

We Are Going To Try to Replicate This On Zoom.

We Are Asking People Who Want To Have High Quality Discussions On Their Research To Send Us A Mini-Briefing On What They Are Working On.

We Will Match Them Up with TWO Different People.

One of them will be a SOULMATE. This is the person doing work most similar to your own. The two of you can have a conversation on subjects the two of you understand better than anyone else at the conference. Your partner really really “gets it”.

A different conversation will be set up for you in a WILD COMBO.

This is some one working on something radically different than what you work on and in a radically different way. The purpose of Wild Combos is cross-fertilization. Often we are stuck because we are in the rut implied by one tiny literature. Someone from a completely different perspective can throw something into your mix you never would have come up with any other way.

HOW DO YOU GET IN?

DEVSOC LINK 2021 is Open To All Members of the ASA Development Sociology Section.

The Conference is Free.

You Do Have to Register For the Conference.

We Will Open Up Registration After We Publish the Program So You Can Decide If This Is Worth Your While.

There Is No Minimum Attendance Rule For Registrants – So There Is No Downside To Registering.

To Get On the Program – Either For Giving a Paper, For Organizing a Fully Constituted Paper Session, For Nominating a Topic for the Open Table Discussions or For Getting Matched Up in a Soulmate/Wild Combo Duo – You Have To Send in an Application.

There are Separate Applications for Individual Papers, Full Paper Sessions, Open Table Topics and for Soulmate/Wild Combo Duos.

All Four Types of Application are Due APRIL 20

You email them to socdevlink@gmail.com.

We will be notifying people of the results by MAY 20.

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